IT Services



Guide to making XML documents




1. Introduction

Today, documents are usually prepared electronically using a word processor such as Word or OpenOffice. Such programs allow their users to make good-looking documents easily and quickly. However, there are problems associated with the multitude of different formats and programs used to produce documents. For instance:

OUCS has adopted an open, vendor independent format approach to maintain our documentation in an accessible and interchangeable format. Our system uses XML or eXtensible Markup Language to store documents. XML allows the user to develop their own rules to code up their documents. However, there are already many different versions of XML rules available so we do not need to develop anything new for OUCS. Our system uses a modified version of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) XML for writing documentation.



1.1. TEI and OUCS

The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines are an international and interdisciplinary standard that enables libraries, museums, publishers, and individual scholars to represent a variety of literary and linguistic texts for online research, teaching, and preservation.

The TEI standard is maintained by a consortium of leading institutions and projects worldwide; Oxford is one of these institutions. Two of the major players in the TEI are members of OUCS: Lou Burnard and Sebastian Rahtz. Lou joined the Text Encoding Initiative project as its European Editor back in 1989 (a post he still holds), while Sebastian is one of the consortium's directors and actively develops the TEI itself.



1.2. OUCS Web Site Accessibility

Since 2002 it has been law to provide documents (including web pages) in accessible formats to users of alternative technologies such as screen readers. The relevant legislation is the Special Educational Needs and Disability Act (SENDA) 2001 which is part 4 of the Disability discrimination Act (DDA). This act brought Education establishments into line with commercial providers in the way that they provide information and services to the disabled community.

The W3C organisation have created various standards for web accessibility. These are:

Priority level details

All OUCS pages should reach level 1 standard. The University has decided that its web sites should ideally conform to the level 2 standard and meet as many level 3 points as possible.

The following document includes details on how to make your XML documents accessible to as wide an audience as possible. Please make sure that you follow these accessibility guidelines - it's the LAW!



2. How does the OUCS system work?

The OUCS XML documentation system has six components:

  1. An XML schema, derived from the Text Encoding Initiative, located at http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/schemas/tei-oucs.rng
  2. A set of XSLT stylesheets, which can transform document instances to HTML pages; see http://www.tei-c.org/Tools/Stylesheets/
  3. A set of XSLT stylesheets, which can transform document instances into PDF for printing; see http://www.tei-c.org/Tools/Stylesheets/
  4. CSS stylesheets for displaying the XML files directly (http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/schemas/tei-oucs.css, which can also be used with some editors), and for enhancing the HTML versions (http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/stylesheet/oucs/oucs.css)
  5. The XML text document
  6. The change management system where all the material is stored

Taking each of these parts in turn:



2.1. XML Schema

The rules of the TEI XML format are stored in a schema (we use the RELAXNG schema language) file. This file defines the structure of how XML is to be written and is the key to transforming the text from one format to another. In order to write a valid TEI XML document the schema has to be followed. Luckily there are many XML editors that look after the schema for you and show any errors when the document is tested against the schema.



2.2. XSLT Stylesheets

An XSLT Stylesheet or Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation Stylesheet is basically a set of rules to process a XML document. It turns an XML rendition of a file into the final version of a file. OUCS uses two versions of XSLT files, one turns an XML file into a web page (HTML format), the other turns XML into PDF format for printing.



2.3. CSS Stylesheets

CSS or Cascading Style Sheets are files containing information on how a document is to be presented e.g. bold, red headings or grey backgrounds. There are two versions used by OUCS: one displays the XML file directly and is fairly simple; the other displays the final web page and is fairly complex.



2.4. Version Control System

This is the method by which documents are stored. OUCS uses an open source system called Subversion to store XML documents. It is not restricted in the type of documents it can accept, allowing us to store just about anything we might need.



3. Getting Started - The Basics

There are a few steps that need to be taken before you can get documents up on the web site. These are outlined below:

Obtain a suitable XML editor
We recommend the cross-platform oXygen editor, for which we have a site licence; see the document on How to use oXygen at OUCS
Obtain a Subversion client
We recommend Syncro SVN, the client which comes with oXygen. Details are given in the document Using the Syncro Subversion client
Obtain a Subversion account
Accounts can be setup by visiting https://svn.oucs.ox.ac.uk/admin/useradmin/
Write your document!
This part is up to you! If you are unsure how to start, open an XML file and save under a different name. After removing the original content of the file, you can now use this file and add your own content as necessary.

Before submitting your file to Subversion, you should check your document's syntax. Most XML editors have facilities to check the validity of your document against your schema. Make any corrections necessary before submitting the file to the main Subversion repository. Also bear in mind that your document should be fully accessible and SENDA compliant.



3.1. A Few Definitions

Elements and Tags
XML documents have lots of elements, one example is the title element. This begins with a start-tag <title> and is closed by the end-tag </title>. Any text between the start and end tags is therefore defined as the title of the document. Most XML tags work in this way: a start tag, some text, followed by an end tag. There are some elements that are self closing (i.e. they have no end tag); where appropriate these will be highlighted later in this document.
Content and Data
Any text between tags is the content of the element. This can be of two forms: the actual information or data; and other elements. Where the two occur together this is termed mixed content.
Attributes

All elements can have additional properties beside the element name and content. These properties are the attributes of an element and they consist of name-value pairs. For example a <div> element can have the attribute id="xxx", where xxx represents a name or number. In the example below, the id is 'email':

Configuring your email client text....
XML structure and nesting tags

XML is very strict on its element structure, especially compared to HTML. In XML, tags usually have to be started and ended. They must be nested properly and used in the correct place within the document hierarchy. This generally means that you cannot open a new tag e.g. <p> without closing the previous <p> tag. (N.B. there are exceptions to this rule e.g. self-closing tags).



3.2. Dissecting the OUCS XML Template

Viewing the OUCS template code in your editor shows the document structure. The complete page structure is shown below:

Markup for OUCS documents Sebastian Rahtz May 2009 webmaster@it.ox.ac.uk This is the master version of an original document. $LastChangedDate: 2014-04-23 10:28:49 +0100 (Wed, 23 Apr 2014) $ $LastChangedBy: publish-button $ $LastChangedRevision: 157843 $

First comes the declaration that the file is a TEI document <TEI.2>. This is effectively the start tag for the document, all other elements must be correctly arranged or nested inside the <TEI.2> tags for the document to be valid TEI XML.

The first element inside <TEI.2> is the <teiHeader> element. Everything within this element is part of the document's Metadata (Metadata is data about the document, e.g. its title, author, creation date etc.). OUCS documents have a number of fields in the <teiHeader>; some have to be manually completed, such as the title of the document, while others are automatically added on document submission e.g. Last changed by information. Usually, when writing your own documents, you should complete the following metadata elements:

It will also be necessary to complete an extra sections in the header recording who is responsible

The end of the metadata is marked by the closing </teiHeader> tag.

After the metadata comes the body of the document. This can be split into three sections:

<front>
contains any prefatory matter (headers, title page, prefaces, dedications, etc.) found before the start of a text proper.
<body>
contains the whole body of a single unitary text, excluding any front or back matter.
<back>
contains any appendices, etc., following the main part of a text.

The majority of OUCS documents only use the body section for the text. This is shown in the next example:

... Your text goes in here....

If you do want to include front and/or back additions to your document, the sections are coded in the following manner:

Markup for OUCS documents Ian Senior May 2005 Your text goes in here.... Appendix More text in here...


4. Coding your document

Like HTML, XML relies on elements to code up the document. If you are familiar with coding HTML files the transition to XML should be fairly painless. OUCS XML has many elements available for use, although in any one document only a subset of these will ever be applied. In this section we discuss the elements making up the body of a text.



4.1. Sectioning your text

Your text may be just a series of paragraphs, or these paragraphs may be grouped together into chapters, sections, subsections, etc. In the former case, each paragraph is embedded inside a the <p> element. In the latter case, the <body> may be divided into a series of <div> elements, which may be further subdivided. An example of div structure is shown below:

This is my heading This is a paragraph This is my inner section heading This is a paragraph in the inner section

Sectioning your document has important effects on the OUCS web site. Each div used is processed when the document is converted into html. Major divisions are treated as separate web pages and help to form the basis of the internal page navigation system. Each division is also sequentially numbered: 1, 2, 3 ... Where a div section is within another div, it is treated as a subsection and numbered accordingly e.g. 2.1, 2.2, 2.3....

Sectioning documents also influences the HTML output to browsers. The title of a document is always given the <h1> tag, major divisions are thus given the <h2> tag and minor section divisions are given <h3>, <h4>, <h5> etc. depending on how deep they are nested within the document.

Correct structural markup for documentation is important for accessibility. When documents are marked up in a structured way, they allow users of alternative technologies to discover the main sections and subsections more quickly and more easily. The structure allows users to jump from one section to another, without the need to read all of the information on the page. Documents that do not use structured markup pose a problem (to screen reader users in particular), as it is very difficult to find out what is on a page without reading all of the text. Where structural markup has not been used, the author has often employed styles (bold, italic, etc.) to indicate different sections and headings. While obvious to sighted readers, the structure is lost to screen reader users who must read the page to find out if it is of interest to them.

It is a requirement for authors to structure their documents in an accessible manner: relying on style alone is to be avoided as this results in inaccessible documents.

The following elements can be used to divide up your text:

<p>
marks paragraphs in prose.
<div>
contains a subdivision of the front, body, or back of a text.

When structural divisions smaller than a <div> are necessary, inner <div> elements may be used, without limit to the depth of nesting (see example above).

A div element can have the following three attributes:
type
This indicates the conventional name for this category of text division. Its value might be something like ‘Preface’.
id
This specifies a unique identifier for the division, which may be used for cross references or other links to it, such as a commentary. It is often useful to provide an id attribute for every major structural unit in a text, and to derive the id values in some systematic way, for example by appending a section number to a short code for the title of the work in question.
n
The n attribute specifies a mnemonic short name or number for the division, which can be used to identify it in preference to the id. If a conventional form of reference or abbreviation for the parts of a work already exists (such as the book/chapter/verse pattern of Biblical citations), the n attribute is the place to record it.
The attributes id and n, indeed, are so widely useful that they are allowed on any element in any TEI schema: they are global attributes.

The value of every id attribute must be unique within a document. They may be used to derive the names of HTML pages, so giving sensible mnemonic names is a good idea.



4.2. Headings and Closings

Every <div> may have a title or heading, and (less commonly) a closing such as ‘End of Chapter 1’. The following elements may be used to mark them up:
<head>
contains any heading, for example, the title of a section, or the heading of a list or glossary.
<trailer>
contains a closing title or footer appearing at the end of a division of a text.

Here is an example of their use:

This is my heading This is the body of the text This is the trailer to my text

N.B. At present it is not possible to use the <head> tag without using the <div> tag first.



4.3. Marking Highlighted Phrases



4.3.1. Changes of Typeface, etc.

Highlighted words or phrases are those made visibly different from the rest of the text, typically by a change of type font, handwriting style, or ink color, intended to draw the reader's attention to them.

<hi>
marks a word or phrase as graphically distinct from the surrounding text, for reasons concerning which no claim is made.
Code view:
<hi>example</hi>
Rendered view:
example
Alternatively, where the cause for the highlighting can be identified with confidence, a number of other, more specific, elements are available. All but the first two are OUCS extensions to the standard TEI markup.
<emph>
marks words or phrases which are stressed or emphasized for linguistic or rhetorical effect
Code view:
<emph>example</emph>
Rendered view:
example
<term>
contains a single-word, multi-word or symbolic designation which is regarded as a technical term
Code view:
<term>example</term>
Rendered view:
example
<gi>
An SGML, XML or HTML element name
Code view:
<gi>h1</gi>
Rendered view:
<h1>
<Button>
A button which a user can see
Code view:
<Button>Logout</Button>
Rendered view:
Logout
<Code>
Some sort of computer language code
Code view:
<Code>\textbf{a}$^34$</Code>
Rendered view:
\textbf{a}$^34$
<Command>
The name of a command
Code view:
<Command>tcsh</Command>
Rendered view:
tcsh
<Field>
A labelled input field
Code view:
<Field>Subject</Field>
Rendered view:
Subject
<Filespec>
A file or directory specification of any kind
Code view:
<Filespec>C:\Windows\My Documents</Filespec>
Rendered view:
C:\Windows\My Documents
<Icon>
an icon in a GUI
Code view:
<Icon>Notepad</Icon>
Rendered view:
Notepad
<Input>
Text for a user to type
Code view:
<Input>quota</Input>
Rendered view:
quota
<Key>
A key to press
Code view:
<Key>R</Key>
Rendered view:
<R>
<Keyword>
A keyword in some technical code the user is being asked to write
Code view:
<Keyword>font-family</Keyword>
Rendered view:
font-family
<Label>
The label for a button, radio box, etc.
Code view:
<Label>select to activate account</Label>
Rendered view:
select to activate account
<Link>
The text of a link which is being described
Code view:
<Link>IT Information</Link>
Rendered view:
IT Information
<Menu>
A menu item
Code view:
<Menu>Save as</Menu>
Rendered view:
[Save as]
<Output>
What comes back when you give a command
Code view:
<Output>job completed</Output>
Rendered view:
job completed
<Program>
A simple program listing
Code view:
<Program>i:=0;
j:=-1;</Program>
Rendered view:
i:=0; j:=-1;
<Prompt>
A prompt from the computer
Code view:
<Prompt>password:</Prompt>
Rendered view:
password:
<Screen>
A prettified display of text screenshot
Code view:
<Screen>Thanks!
Your work is complete.</Screen>
Rendered view:
Thanks! Your work is complete.
<Software>
The name of a program
Code view:
<Software>Microsoft Word</Software>
Rendered view:
Microsoft Word
<Value>
A possible value for some option
Code view:
<Value>Times-Roman 10pt</Value>
Rendered view:
Times-Roman 10pt
If you ever really need it, the <lb/> element marks the start of a new (typographic) line.


4.4. Cross References and Links

Explicit cross references or links from one point to another in a text in the same XML document may be encoded using the elements described in section 4.4.1. Simple Cross References. References or links to elements of some other XML document, or to parts of non-XML documents, may be encoded using the TEI extended pointers described in section 4.4.2. Extended Pointers.

Accessibility of your links is important. The text you use can either enhance a user's understanding of where the link will lead, or leave them clueless. The worst phrase you can use for a link is Click Here or simply Here: in both instances the user is left with no clear idea of where the link could lead. This problem is compounded for a screen reader user: they can get lists of all links from any given page, but if the author of the page has just said Click Here or Here, they will get a list consisting of just that. The user will be left stranded on the page with no clear way to move forwards in their search for information.

An accessible link is one that conveys both where the link will go and the information the user is likely to find. By default our system will add a title attribute to any link you make on your page when it is transformed into HTML. However, while this is good practice and a nice failsafe measure, it will only add the same text as the link text. This might be adequate in some circumstances, but to make your links more accessible you should add your own additional text using the n attribute. People browsing with modern visual browsers will see your additional link information when they mouse over your link, and screen reader users will have more information about where the link will take them as the title attribute is read out to them.



4.4.1. Simple Cross References

A cross reference from one point to another within a single document can be encoded using either of the following elements:
<ref>
a reference to another location in the current document usually modified by additional text.
<ptr>
a pointer to another location in the current document.
These elements share the following attribute:
target
specifies the destination of the pointer.

The difference between these two elements is that <ptr> is an empty element, simply marking a point from which a link is to be made, whereas <ref> may contain some text as well --- typically the text of the cross-reference itself. The <ptr> element would be used for a cross reference which is indicated by a symbol or icon, or in an electronic text by a button.

The following two forms, for example, are equivalent:

See especially section 12 on page 34. See especially .
The value of the target attribute must be present in the current XML document. This implies that the passage or phrase being pointed at must bear an identifier, and must therefore be tagged as an element of some kind. In the following example, the cross reference is to a <div> element: ...see especially .... ... Concerning Identifiers...
The id attribute is global (i.e. can be used on any element), which means all elements in a document can be pointed to in this way. In the following example, a paragraph has been given an identifier so that it may be pointed at: ...this is discussed in the paragraph on links ...Links may be made to any kind of element ...

Sometimes the target of a cross reference does not correspond with any particular feature of a text, and so may not be tagged as an element of some kind. If the desired target is simply a point in the current document, the easiest way to mark it is by introducing an <anchor> element at the appropriate spot.

.... ....


4.4.2. Extended Pointers

The elements <ptr> and <ref> can only be used for cross-references whose targets occur within the same XML document as their source. They can also refer only to XML elements. The elements discussed in this section are not restricted in these ways.
<xptr>
defines a pointer to another location in the current document or an external document.
<xref>
defines a pointer to another location in the current document or an external document, usually modified by additional text or comment.

In addition to the attributes already discussed in section 4.4.1. Simple Cross References above, these elements share the following additional attribute, which is used to specify the target of the cross reference or link:

url
A Web URL specifying the destination

The following example shows how to link to another page and web site

See local information about email clients or go to

The above example renders as follows:

See local information about email clients or go to http://www.google.co.uk

To link to a specific section on another page you should use the following syntax:

faults, problems, or special requests


4.5. Addresses

The <address> element is used to mark a postal address of any kind. It contains one or more <addrLine> elements, one for each line of the address.
address
contains a postal or other address, for example of a publisher, an organization, or an individual.
addrLine
contains one line of a postal or other address.
Here is a simple example: Oxford University Computing Services 13 Banbury Rd Oxford OX2 6NN


4.6. Lists



4.6.1. The various kinds of lists

The element <list> is used to mark any kind of list. A list is a sequence of text items, which may be ordered, unordered, or a glossary list. Each item may be preceded by an item label (in a glossary list, this label is the term being defined):
<list>
contains any sequence of items organized as a list. Attributes include:
type
describes the form of the list. This attribute can have the following values:
  • unordered (for lists with bullet-marked items)
  • ordered (for lists with numbered or lettered items)
  • gloss (for lists consisting of a set of technical terms, each marked with a <label> element and accompanied by a gloss or definition marked as an <item>)
If the attribute is omitted, the default is for the list to be an unordered list.
rend
describes how the labels should appear. The rend attribute can have the following values:
  • no-bullets (for producing unordered lists with no bullet points)
  • lower-alpha (for producing ordered lists with labels a, b, c, ...)
  • upper-alpha (for producing ordered lists with labels A, B, C, ...)
  • lower-roman (for producing ordered lists with labels i, ii, iii, ...)
  • upper-roman (for producing ordered lists with labels I, II, III, ...)
If the attribute is omitted, the default is to produce the labels 1, 2, 3, ... (for ordered lists) or plain bullet points (for unordered lists).
<item>
contains one component of a list.
<label>
contains the label associated with an item in a list; in glossaries, marks the term being defined.

Individual list items are tagged with <item>. The first <item> may optionally be preceded by a <head>, which gives a heading for the list. The numbering of a list may be omitted (if reconstructible), indicated using the n attribute on each item, or (rarely) tagged as content using the <label> element. In order to achieve the same result with different browsers, the value of n should be greater than 0.



4.6.2. Examples of lists

Example 1

An unordered list First item in list Second item in list Third item in list

An unordered list

  • First item in list
  • Second item in list
  • Third item in list

Example 2

An ordered list First item in list Second item in list Third item in list

An ordered list

  1. First item in list
  2. Second item in list
  3. Third item in list

Example 3

An ordered list with controlled numbering First item in list Second item in list Third item in list

An ordered list with controlled numbering

  1. First item in list
  2. Second item in list
  3. Third item in list

Example 4

An ordered list with letters for labels First item in list Second item in list Third item in list

An ordered list with letters for labels

  1. First item in list
  2. Second item in list
  3. Third item in list

Example 5

An ordered list with controlled lettering First item in list Second item in list Third item in list

An ordered list with controlled lettering

  1. First item in list
  2. Second item in list
  3. Third item in list

Example 6

A glossary list One First item in list Two Second item in list Three Third item in list

A glossary list

One
First item in list
Two
Second item in list
Three
Third item in list

The styles should not be mixed in the same list.

Example 7

A simple two-column table may be treated as a glossary list, tagged <list type=gloss>. Here, each item comprises a term and a gloss, marked with <label> and <item> respectively.

Vocabulary nu now lhude loudly bloweth blooms med meadow wude wood awe ewe lhouth lows sterteth bounds, frisks verteth pedit murie merrily swik cease naver never

The above is rendered as follows:

Vocabulary

nu
now
lhude
loudly
bloweth
blooms
med
meadow
wude
wood
awe
ewe
lhouth
lows
sterteth
bounds, frisks
verteth
pedit
murie
merrily
swik
cease
naver
never


4.6.3. Nested lists

Lists of whatever kind can, of course, nest within list items to any depth required. Here, for example, a glossary list contains two items, each of which is itself a simple list:

EVIL I am cast upon a horrible desolate island, void of all hope of recovery. I am singled out and separated as it were from all the world to be miserable. I am divided from mankind &#8212; a solitaire; one banished from human society. GOOD But I am alive; and not drowned, as all my ship's company were. But I am singled out, too, from all the ship's crew, to be spared from death... But I am not starved, and perishing on a barren place, affording no sustenances....

The above is rendered as follows:

EVIL
  • I am cast upon a horrible desolate island, void of all hope of recovery.
  • I am singled out and separated as it were from all the world to be miserable.
  • I am divided from mankind - a solitaire; one banished from human society.
GOOD
  • But I am alive; and not drowned, as all my ship's company were.
  • But I am singled out, too, from all the ship's crew, to be spared from death...
  • But I am not starved, and perishing on a barren place, affording no sustenances....


4.7. Tables

The following elements are provided for describing tables:
<table>
contains text displayed in tabular form, in rows and columns.
<row>
contains one row of a table. Attributes include:
role
indicates the kind of information held in the cells of this row. This attribute should have the value label for labels or descriptive information, and data for actual data values. If omitted, it defaults to data.
<cell>
contains one cell of a table. Attributes include:
role
indicates the kind of information held in the cell. This attribute should have the value label for labels or descriptive information, and data for actual data values. If omitted, it defaults to data.
cols
indicates the number of columns occupied by this cell. If omitted, it defaults to 1.
rows
indicates the number of rows occupied by this cell. If omitted, it defaults to 1.

The <table> element can also take the align, summary, width, border, frame, rules, cellspacing and cellpadding attributes defined in HTML, and the conversion to HTML will pass them straight through.



4.7.1. Making your table accessible

Caution is advised when using tables as it is very easy to make them inaccessible to users of alternative technologies e.g. screen readers. It is your responsibility to make sure that any table used is comprehensible when it is linearised and that it contains suitable accessibility attributes.

Screen readers linearise tables when they are reading the content out to the user. This means that if you have failed to take this into account when designing your table, the screen reader user will not understand the content of your table. To check to see how your table will be read out, go to http://wave.webaim.org/. Run your page containing the table through this online checker. It will show you how the table will be read to a screen reader user.

All tables should be given the summary attribute regardless of whether they are for data or page layout. For data tables a short summary of the table content must be added for accessibility. Where a table is used for layout, the summary attribute is included, but left empty.

Here is an example:

table shows the rise and fall of mortality figures during the plague years 1 2 3 St. Leonard's, Shoreditch 64 84 119 St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate 65 105 116 St. Giles's, Cripplegate 213 421 554

The above is rendered as:

Table 1. table shows the rise and fall of mortality figures during the plague
years
1 2 3
St. Leonard's, Shoreditch 64 84 119
St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate 65 105 116
St. Giles's, Cripplegate 213 421 554


4.7.2. Making your table sortable



4.7.2.1. Normal use

If a <table> element has a rend attribute with the value tablesorter, the table will be rendered with the cells of the first column sorted and with buttons on each column that enable the person viewing the page to sort the table on another column.

...

Here is an example of what can be done:

Table 2. table shows a use of the tablesorter rend (derived from an example at http://tablesorter.com/docs/)
First Name    Last Name    Age    Total    Discount    Difference    Date and time ISO UK 1 UK 2
Peter Parker 28 £9.99 20.9% +12.1 Sep 9, 2002 8:14 AM 2002-09-09 09-09-2002 09/09/2002
John Good 33 £19.99 125% +12 Jan 12, 2003 5:14 AM 2003-01-12 12-01-2003 12/01/2003
Clark Kent 18 £15.89 44% -26 Jan 18, 2001 11:14 AM 2001-01-18 18-01-2001 18/01/2001
Bruce Almighty 45 £153.19 44.7% +77 Sep 10, 2002 9:12 AM 2002-09-10 10-09-2002 10/09/2002
Bruce Evans 22 £13.19 11% -100.9 Sep 1, 2002 9:12 AM 2002-09-01 01-09-2002 01/09/2002

The above can be achieved using the following TEI:

table shows a user of the tablesorter rend (derived from an example at http://tablesorter.com/docs/) First Name&#160;&#160;&#160; Last Name&#160;&#160;&#160; Age&#160;&#160;&#160; Total&#160;&#160;&#160; Discount&#160;&#160;&#160; Difference&#160;&#160;&#160; Date and time ISO UK 1 UK 2 Peter Parker 28 £9.99 20.9% +12.1 Sep 9, 2002 8:14 AM 2002-09-09 09-09-2002 09/09/2002 John Good 33 £19.99 125% +12 Jan 12, 2003 5:14 AM 2003-01-12 12-01-2003 12/01/2003 Clark Kent 18 £15.89 44% -26 Jan 18, 2001 11:14 AM 2001-01-18 18-01-2001 18/01/2001 Bruce Almighty 45 £153.19 44.7% +77 Sep 10, 2002 9:12 AM 2002-09-10 10-09-2002 10/09/2002 Bruce Evans 22 £13.19 11% -100.9 Sep 1, 2002 9:12 AM 2002-09-01 01-09-2002 01/09/2002


4.7.2.2. Customising tablesorter

There are two ways in which the use of tablesorter can be customised. You will also find the documentation for tablesorter useful.



4.7.2.2.1. Customising tablesorter: for specific tables

This is appropriate if you want to do your own customisation of tablesorter for specific tables that occur in a TEI file.

In the teiHeader of the TEI file, you provide JavaScript like the following:

<html:script type="text/javascript"> var someOtherTextExtraction = function(node) { var anchortext = node.innerHTML.indexOf("--anchor--"); if ( anchortext == -1 ) { return node.innerHTML; } else { return node.innerHTML.substring(anchortext + 15); } } $(document).ready(function() { $table = $(".tablesorternoinitcode").tablesorter( {dateFormat: 'uk', sortList: [[0,0]], textExtraction: someOtherTextExtraction} ); } ); </html:script>

And you alter the table to have the following rends:

...

Gotcha: if you do provide a <html:script> element, remember to define the html namespace. For more details, see the section of this document labelled Using HTML elements in a TEI file.

The above assumes you want to do the same initialisation code for each table. If you want different initialisation code for some of the tables, add another value to the rend attribute of each table:

...

and refer to this value (rather than tablesorternoinitcode) in the initialisation code:

$table = $(".tableone").tablesorter(

The tablesorternoinitcode must still be present in the rend. It is being used to indicate that you do not want the XSL to generate the default initialisation code.



4.7.2.2.2. Customising tablesorter: for all tables of a site

This is appropriate if you want a micro site to have full control of the customisation of tablesorter.

The file oucsstandard.xsl has the following definition for the template outputTableSorterInitCode. In the XSL for the micro site, you define a template that overrides this.

<xsl:template name="outputTableSorterInitCode"> <script type="text/javascript"> var GTSTextExtraction = function(node) { var anchortext = node.innerHTML.indexOf("--anchor--"); if ( anchortext == -1 ) { return node.innerHTML; } else { return node.innerHTML.substring(anchortext + 15); } } $(document).ready(function() { $table = $(".tablesorter:not(.tablesorternoinitcode)").tablesorter( {dateFormat: 'uk', sortList: [[0,0]], textExtraction: GTSTextExtraction} ); } ); </script> <xsl:call-template name="outputLinebreak"/> </xsl:template>


4.8. Figures and Graphics

Not all the components of a document are necessarily textual. The most straight forward text will often contain diagrams or illustrations, to say nothing of documents in which image and text are inextricably intertwined, or electronic resources in which the two are complementary. This poses accessibility issues for users who cannot see the images. What are they? Are they important to the text, or just page decoration? Is the image a graph or simple picture? Has the author provided extra information about the graphic for those that cannot see it? If you do not provide alternative text for graphics or other accessibiity features in the page coding, the page will be inaccessible to some visitors.

The following tags and attributes are used to add images to web pages:

<figure>
marks the spot at which a graphic is to be inserted in a document. Attributes include:
url
The location and file name of a graphic.
width
The width to which the graphic should be scaled. If omitted, it defaults to the width of the graphic.
height
The height to which the graphic should be scaled. If omitted, it defaults to the height of the graphic.
scale
The extent which the graphic should be scaled (eg 0.5). If omitted, it defaults to 1.
<figDesc>
contains a textual description of the appearance or content of a graphic, essential for accessible graphics.

A picture is inserted into a document using the url attribute of the <figure> element:

Mr Fezziwig's Ball A Cruikshank engraving showing Mr Fezziwig leading a group of revellers.

Usually, a graphic will have at the least an identifying title, which should be encoded using the <head> element. Images which are given a head tag have this text automatically converted to a figure caption and are numbered sequentially throughout the document. It is also essential to include a brief description of the image using <figDesc>. If the image is difficult to describe in just a few words, you should provide an alternative page where a full account of the image can be given to the user: this extra information should be provided via a [d] link. These are normal url links to normal web pages. By convention the [d] link should be provided next to the image in question; users needing greater detail about a given image will click on the [d] link for more information.

If the image is for decoration only (very rare on OUCS pages), it is still necessary to include the <figDesc> element in your document, but in this case it should be left blank. By convention the image is then considered just page decoration and unimportant to the reader.

If you want to control the way text flows around an image, use a rend value, as described in the Rends section.



4.9. Getting a TEI file to display a newsfeed

A newsfeed can be displayed by putting a <xptr> element with a rend of rss and a type of transclude inside a <p> element. The url attribute has the URL of the newsfeed. Our XSL can cope with newsfeeds written in RSS 2.0, RSS 1.0 and Atom 1.0.

<p> <xptr rend="rss" type="transclude" url="http://newsrss.bbc.co.uk/rss/newsonline_uk_edition/front_page/rss.xml" /> </p>

This will produce output like the following:

Bidding starts for fracking licencesThe bidding process for licences to extract shale gas - using the controversial process fracking - will begin later on Monday, the government announces.
UN calls for immediate Gaza truceThe UN Security Council calls for an "immediate and unconditional humanitarian ceasefire" in Gaza after the quietest night in weeks.
Dinosaurs' extinction 'bad luck'Dinosaurs might have survived if the asteroid that wiped them out had hit the Earth a few million years later or earlier, a new study suggests.
Passport workers go on strikeThousands of passport workers are striking over staffing and pay, with the government saying their action could threaten people's holidays.
MH17 downing 'may be war crime'The downing of Malaysian plane MH17 in east Ukraine may constitute a "war crime", UN human rights chief Navi Pillay says.
Government 'turns back' on victimsMinisters are "turning their backs" on victims of domestic violence, shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper will say in a speech later.
California hit by raging wildfiresTwo fast-moving fires in California destroy 10 homes and force the evacuation of hundreds more, as a man dies in a lightning strike in Los Angeles.
Ferry students 'floated from cabins'Students who survived South Korea's ferry disaster describe how they floated out of flooded cabins, as the trial of the crew continues.
Tulisa: I'm lucky to be here nowThe former N-Dubz singer tells Newsbeat "there was a really low point" during her recent assault charge case and drug trial.
RAC urges parking funds transparencyCouncils should show where they are spending the money they raise on parking fees as motorists see higher charges, says the RAC.

By default, 10 items of the feed will get output together with an RSS icon that allows people to subscribe to the newsfeed.

Gotcha: the web page will not change when new items get added to the feed unless you arrange for your page not to be cached by AxKit. Please contact webmaster@oucs.ox.ac.uk to get this done.



4.9.1. rsssummary gives a different style of output

Other components can be added to the rend to control what gets output and how it gets output.

A different style of output is delivered if you add rsssummary to the rend:

<p> <xptr rend="rss rsssummary" type="transclude" url="http://newsrss.bbc.co.uk/rss/newsonline_uk_edition/front_page/rss.xml" /> </p>

This will produce output like the following:

Bidding starts for fracking licencesThe bidding process for licences to extract shale gas - using the controversial process fracking - will begin later on Monday, the government announces.
UN calls for immediate Gaza truceThe UN Security Council calls for an "immediate and unconditional humanitarian ceasefire" in Gaza after the quietest night in weeks.
Dinosaurs' extinction 'bad luck'Dinosaurs might have survived if the asteroid that wiped them out had hit the Earth a few million years later or earlier, a new study suggests.
Passport workers go on strikeThousands of passport workers are striking over staffing and pay, with the government saying their action could threaten people's holidays.
MH17 downing 'may be war crime'The downing of Malaysian plane MH17 in east Ukraine may constitute a "war crime", UN human rights chief Navi Pillay says.
Government 'turns back' on victimsMinisters are "turning their backs" on victims of domestic violence, shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper will say in a speech later.
California hit by raging wildfiresTwo fast-moving fires in California destroy 10 homes and force the evacuation of hundreds more, as a man dies in a lightning strike in Los Angeles.
Ferry students 'floated from cabins'Students who survived South Korea's ferry disaster describe how they floated out of flooded cabins, as the trial of the crew continues.
Tulisa: I'm lucky to be here nowThe former N-Dubz singer tells Newsbeat "there was a really low point" during her recent assault charge case and drug trial.
RAC urges parking funds transparencyCouncils should show where they are spending the money they raise on parking fees as motorists see higher charges, says the RAC.



4.9.2. rsslimit-all outputs all items and rssnoimage omits the RSS icon

Suppose you want all the items of the feed to be output but you do not want the RSS icon:

<p> <xptr rend="rss rssnoimage rsslimit-all" type="transclude" url="http://newsrss.bbc.co.uk/rss/newsonline_uk_edition/front_page/rss.xml" /> </p>

This will produce output like the following:

Bidding starts for fracking licencesThe bidding process for licences to extract shale gas - using the controversial process fracking - will begin later on Monday, the government announces.
UN calls for immediate Gaza truceThe UN Security Council calls for an "immediate and unconditional humanitarian ceasefire" in Gaza after the quietest night in weeks.
Dinosaurs' extinction 'bad luck'Dinosaurs might have survived if the asteroid that wiped them out had hit the Earth a few million years later or earlier, a new study suggests.
Passport workers go on strikeThousands of passport workers are striking over staffing and pay, with the government saying their action could threaten people's holidays.
MH17 downing 'may be war crime'The downing of Malaysian plane MH17 in east Ukraine may constitute a "war crime", UN human rights chief Navi Pillay says.
Government 'turns back' on victimsMinisters are "turning their backs" on victims of domestic violence, shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper will say in a speech later.
California hit by raging wildfiresTwo fast-moving fires in California destroy 10 homes and force the evacuation of hundreds more, as a man dies in a lightning strike in Los Angeles.
Ferry students 'floated from cabins'Students who survived South Korea's ferry disaster describe how they floated out of flooded cabins, as the trial of the crew continues.
Tulisa: I'm lucky to be here nowThe former N-Dubz singer tells Newsbeat "there was a really low point" during her recent assault charge case and drug trial.
RAC urges parking funds transparencyCouncils should show where they are spending the money they raise on parking fees as motorists see higher charges, says the RAC.
Rain, hail and lightning cause chaosLightning strikes, hail, torrential rain and flash flooding cause major travel problems across part of south-east England.
NHS 'at breaking point', and the 'parking cowboys' - the papersBoth the Times and the Sun lead with stories about overstretched services in the NHS, and the Mail says Britons are being fleeced by rogue parking firms..
Police told off for Lily Allen imageLily Allen posted a mocked-up picture on Instagram of her being arrested by officers in Australia before taking it back down.
Fist bumps 'cleaner than handshakes'Scientists at Aberystwyth University in Wales have shown that more bacteria are transferred by shaking hands, than by fist-bumping or high-fiving.
VIDEO: Dog friendly buses in Hong KongA new bus service has been launched in Hong Kong for pet lovers.
VIDEO: 'It looks like it was never there'Hundreds of people gathered to watch the demolition of three cooling stations at the disused Didcot A Power Station in Oxfordshire on Sunday morning.
VIDEO: Quick-thinking mother saves babyA woman and her baby had a lucky escape, when they narrowly avoided being involved in a car accident in San Francisco.
VIDEO: Tulisa: The deceit was too muchThe former N-Dubz singer explains how she felt when she found out about a media sting which resulted in her drug trial.
VIDEO: Honour for 101-year-old weathermanAmerica's longest serving volunteer weather observer, 101-year-old Richard G Hendrickson, will be honoured on Sunday for 84 years service.
VIDEO: Flotilla on Clyde celebrates GamesThe largest flotilla ever to sail up the River Clyde arrives in Glasgow to celebrate the Commonwealth Games.
Mercedes will rethink orders - WolffMercedes will rethink their race strategy after another Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg battle at the Hungarian Grand Prix.
Lovren joins Liverpool for £20mLiverpool sign defender Dejan Lovren from Southampton for £20m - the third Saints player to move to Anfield this summer.
Glasgow 2014 day-by-day guideYour essential guide to the must-see moments in the Commonwealth Games and a look at some of the biggest stars on show.
VIDEO: Cyclist proposes at CommonwealthsScottish cyclist Chris Pritchard adds a touch of romance to the end of the track cycling programme, proposing to his partner Amanda Ball in the stands.
Women's Team Sky possible - BrailsfordTeam Sky boss Sir Dave Brailsford says he is "talking a lot" about the possibility of a women's professional cycling squad.
'Community banks' to avert debt trapThe best credit unions should be empowered to offer short-term loans that are cheaper than those offered by payday lenders, according to a report from a think tank.
VIDEO: 'Passion' is the key to good bloggingThe BBC's Sameer Hashmi talks to the woman behind the successful Bollywood blog MissMalini.com.
Strip Russia of World Cup - CleggRussia should lose the right to host the 2018 World Cup as part of sanctions following the Malaysia Airlines crash in eastern Ukraine, Nick Clegg says.
VIDEO: Gaza incursion 'no favours to Israel'Ed Miliband has said the Israeli incursion into Gaza is "doing no favours to Israel" and Hamas rocket attacks were "totally unjustified and appalling".
Blood donors 'pass on hepatitis E'Around 1,200 people each year are infected with hepatitis E through donated blood in England, a large study shows.
AUDIO: 'Heroin was a way to not face reality'Former heroin addict Lisa Bryer tells Today programme presenter John Humphrys about her experiences with drugs and her recovery process.
Playgrounds squeezed in places crushMany schools are building new classrooms on outside space to accommodate a growing number of pupils.
VIDEO: Student texts make fly on wall TV showBBC Click's Spencer Kelly goes behind the scenes of the TV programme The Secret Lives of Students.
Wikipedia blocks US Congress editsAdministrators have imposed a ban on Wikipedia alterations from the US House of Representatives, following "persistent disruptive editing".
VIDEO: How to build and fly your own dronePersonal aerial drones that take pictures could soon become a lot more common, thanks to a new invention.
Wildlife loss link to child slaveryNew research suggests that the global reduction in wildlife is connected to an increase in human trafficking and child slavery.
VIDEO: Seals 'stressed' by warming seasWarming seas are reducing the food supply for Antarctic seals, say researchers.
Cheryl Cole lands UK chart topperCheryl Cole lands the fourth solo chart topper of her career, becoming only the third British female to achieve the feat.
VIDEO: Scottish lessons for Commonwealth singerThe singer who performed at the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony on the task of singing in a Scottish accent.
The tragic coffin prankAuthor Jeremy Clay tells the singular story of the girl who was frightened to death by a coffin.
10 things we didn't know last weekDogs get jealous, and more nuggets from the week's news.
Crew tells of helicopter 'fireball'A crew flying in front of a US helicopter brought down by geese have told how it disappeared into a "fireball".
Seventeen hurt at car 'cruise' eventSeventeen people are injured, one of them seriously, when a car ploughs into the crowd at a car 'cruising' event in Plymouth.
Scots eye best-ever medal haulTeam Scotland remain one gold away from their best-ever Commonwealth Games total but edge closer to matching their best for all medals.
Man charged over attack on pensionerA 23-year old man is charged with the attempted murder and sexual assault of an 85 year-old-woman in Edinburgh.
Arson attack on Sinn Féin officeA Sinn Féin constituency office in Derry is targeted in an arson attack.
Volunteers needed for genetic mapA team of scientists is visiting Northern Ireland later in a bid to draw up a genetic map of the British Isles.
138 jobs as electronics firm expandsA Swansea electronics firm is to double its workforce as it moves to a building at the old Visteon factory site.
Four rescued from dinghy in rip tideFour people, including two children, were rescued off the Gower coast after their inflatable dinghy got swept out to sea in a rip tide.
Fresh Benghazi clashes kill 38At least 38 people are killed in clashes between pro-Libyan government troops and Islamist militants in the city of Benghazi, officials say.
'Boko Haram abductions' in CameroonBoko Haram militants are suspected of carrying out two high-profile abductions in Cameroon and a church bombing in northern Nigeria.
MH17 military mission 'unrealistic'Sending an international military mission to secure the crash site of MH17 in eastern Ukraine would be "unrealistic", Dutch PM Mark Rutte says.
Cook makes 95 as England thriveEngland captain Alastair Cook falls for 95 but Gary Ballance hits a century on day one of the third Test against India.
Costa Concordia ends final voyageThe wreck of the Italian cruise ship Costa Concordia enters the port of Genoa for scrapping after a lengthy salvage operation.
Nibali seals Tour de France winItaly's Vincenzo Nibali wraps up his first victory in the three-week race as Marcel Kittel wins the final stage in Paris.
Aruba frees top Venezuela officialThe Caribbean island of Aruba releases a top Venezuelan official, Gen Hugo Carvajal, detained over US accusations of drug-trafficking activities.
'Miners' grave' found in BoliviaA grave containing at least 400 people is unearthed in the Bolivian city of Potosi, with the remains thought to be those of colonial-era miners.
Isis 'may be on UN war crimes list'Fighters from the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Isis) may be added to a list of war crimes suspects in Syria, a UN investigator says.
Israel rejects Gaza UN shelter blameThe Israeli army insists that a mortar round it fired into a UN shelter in Gaza was not responsible for the deaths of at least 15 people.
US 'will send migrant youths home'President Obama meets Central American leaders and says undocumented immigrant children without legal claims to be in the US will be sent home.
Banks named in silver-fix lawsuitDeutsche Bank, HSBC and Bank of Nova Scotia are accused of attempting to rig the price of silver, in a lawsuit filed in the US.
Week in pictures: 19-25 July 2014News photos from around the world
A community's talesSound-portraits of the residents of Carrick-on-Suir
Day in pictures: 25 July 201424 hours of news photos: 25 July
'Hidden' photos reveal library build'Hidden' images reveal Cambridge's University Library
Your pictures: CyclingReaders' photos on the theme of "cycling"
Dream Cars: Innovative Design, Visionary IdeasConcept designs by famous manufacturers on show in US
Taiwan plane crash: In picturesTransAsia Airways plane crashes in Taiwan
Prince George's first yearPrince George's first year
VIDEO: House of CommonsIsrael's response to rocket attacks must be "proportionate", insists a minister.
VIDEO: 'Giant bolt' hits LA beach goersLighting struck people on Venice Beach in Los Angeles, some were treated at scene.
VIDEO: 'I've never been involved in drugs'The singer and former X Factor judge, Tulisa Contostavlo has told the BBC she has never been involved in drugs and she has never taken cocaine.
VIDEO: Heavy fighting in eastern UkraineThere are reports of heavy fighting in eastern Ukraine, close to the site where Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 crashed.
VIDEO: Ebola outbreak: Border crossings to closeMost border crossings in Liberia are being closed to try to halt the spread of Ebola.
VIDEO: Dozens killed in Libya clashesDozens of deaths have been reported in Libya, amid fierce fighting in Benghazi and near the airport in the capital Tripoli.
VIDEO: Costa Concordia ends final voyageThe wrecked Italian cruise ship, the Costa Concordia, has entered the port of Genoa for scrapping after a two-year salvage operation.
VIDEO: Ukrainian refugees 'just want to survive'Up to 230,000 Ukrainians have had to flee their homes because of intense fighting in the east of the country.
VIDEO: Syria's ancient heritage under fireUNESCO has established an observatory in Lebanon aimed at preventing Syria's artefacts being smuggled into neighbouring countries.
No place to hide for children of warLyse Doucet on the plight of children in Syria and Gaza
Getting stuck on things or in thingsHeads stuck in banisters - the official statistics
The bakery in the middle of a desertWhy two Spanish sisters started a bakery in the desert
Sharp falls in China property marketSharp falls in China's property market
From cigarettes and alcohol to marathon manFrom cigarettes and alcohol to coming 10th in Games
Poetry show pulls audience of onePoetry and ViewMaster show targets audience of one
Sun 'can harm sight as well as skin'How the sun can damage sight as well as skin
Perils of the English countrysideThe hidden dangers of a walk in the English countryside
In pictures: London Olympic ParkPhotographer captures Olympic Park from above



4.9.3. rsslimit-2 outputs two items and rssbrief just outputs the titles

Suppose you just want the titles and you only want two items output:

<p> <xptr rend="rss rssbrief rsslimit-2" type="transclude" url="http://newsrss.bbc.co.uk/rss/newsonline_uk_edition/front_page/rss.xml" /> </p>

This will produce output like the following:

Bidding starts for fracking licences
UN calls for immediate Gaza truce



4.9.4. jsdate-XXXX outputs the date the item was published

If you also want the date when the item was published, you can use:

<p> <xptr rend="jsdate-[d_F_Y] rss rssbrief rsslimit-2" type="transclude" url="http://newsrss.bbc.co.uk/rss/newsonline_uk_edition/front_page/rss.xml" /> </p>

Here the rend attribute has a component that starts with jsdate-. This is followed by some notation (e.g., [d_F_Y]) that indicates how you want the date formatted. It uses the same notation that is used by PHP for its date function with the addition of one character: a _ means generate a space.

The date is output in a <span> that has a class of rssdate and the default CSS hides any such span. So you will also need to define some CSS to ensure the date is displayed:

<html:style type="text/css"> .rssdate { display: inline; padding-left: 10px; } </html:style>

This will produce output like the following:

Bidding starts for fracking licences
UN calls for immediate Gaza truce

Here's another example. The TEI elements:

<p> <xptr rend="jsdate-l,_F_jS,_Y rss rssnoimage rsslimit-2" type="transclude" url="http://newsrss.bbc.co.uk/rss/newsonline_uk_edition/front_page/rss.xml" /> </p>

will produce output like the following:

Bidding starts for fracking licencesThe bidding process for licences to extract shale gas - using the controversial process fracking - will begin later on Monday, the government announces.
UN calls for immediate Gaza truceThe UN Security Council calls for an "immediate and unconditional humanitarian ceasefire" in Gaza after the quietest night in weeks.



4.10. Using HTML elements in a TEI file

Although TEI is a rich language so that most of what can be coded in HTML can also be coded in TEI, there are occasions when you may want to use some HTML in a TEI document.

If you wish to do this, you need to introduce a namespace that you can use to say that a particular element belongs to HTML rather than to TEI. Usually, the name html is used for this namespace.

Somewhere you have to indicate which name you are using. Usually, this is done by replacing the first line of the file: <TEI.2> by: <TEI.2 xmlns:html="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
You can then use an HTML element (e.g., the <style> element) by prefixing its name with the namespace html: <html:style type="text/css"> .overdue: { background-color: red; } </html:style> Here is another example: <html:script type="text/javascript"> var GCS_due_date = ""; ... </html:script>

If you want some HTML elements to appear in the <head> element of the HTML that gets generated, you should put these elements between the <fileDesc> and the <revisionDesc> elements (that appear in the <teiHeader>).

Suppose you do wish to add an HTML <style> element. The rules of HTML say the <style> element must finish up in the <head> element of the resulting HTML. So to achieve this, use something like: ... </fileDesc> <html:style type="text/css"> .overdue: { background-color: red; } </html:style> <revisionDesc> ...


4.11. Forms to collect data and send a message

It is possible to provide a form (in a TEI file) that collects some data from a user and sends that data to someone in an e-mail message. There are details about this in a document on FormMail.



4.12. Accessibility of documentation

Accessibility of our documentation is paramount to ensure documents are accessible to all readers and for OUCS to stay on the correct side of the law. It is necessary for all OUCS authors to familiarise themselves with the ways and means to make their documents as accessible as possible.

Authors need to make sure that they follow the following guidelines:

Please use these checkers and make any changes required.



5. Specialised Features



5.1. Generated Divisions

Most modern document production systems have the ability to automatically generate whole sections such as a table of contents or an index. The TEI OUCS scheme provides an element to mark the location at which such a generated section should be placed.
<divGen>
indicates the location at which a textual division generated automatically by a text-processing application is to appear. Attributes include:
type
specifies what type of generated text division (e.g. index, table of contents, etc.) is to appear. Sample values include: index (an index is to be generated and inserted at this point), toc (a table of contents), figlist (a list of figures) and tablist (a list of tables).
The <divGen> element can be placed anywhere that a division element would be legal, as in the following example: ... Preface ... ... Appendix ...

When an index or table of contents is to be encoded (rather than one being generated) for some reason, the <list> element discussed in section 4.6. Lists should be used.