First World War Poetry Digital Archive

An Old Song

AN OLD SONG [2] by EDWARD THOMAS

The sun set, the wind fell, the sea Was like a mirror shaking: The one small wave that clapped the land A mile-long snake of foam was making Where tide had smoothed and wind had dried The vacant sand.

A light divided the swollen clouds And lay most perfectly Like a straight narrow footbridge bright That crossed over the sea to me; And no one else in the whole world Saw that same sight.

I walked elate, my bridge always Just one step from my feet: A robin sang, a shade in shade: And all I did was to repeat: 'I'll go no more a-roving With you, fair maid.'

The sailors' song of merry loving With dusk and sea-gull's mewing Mixed sweet, the lewdness far outweighed By the wild charm the chorus played: 'I'll go no more a-roving With you, fair maid: A-roving, a-roving, since roving's been my ruin, I'll go no more a-roving with you, fair maid.'

In Amsterdam there dwelt a maid--- Mark well what I do say--- In Amsterdam there dwelt a maid And she was a mistress of her trade: I'll go no more a-roving With you, fair maid: A-roving, a-roving, since roving's been my ruin, I'll go no more a-roving with you, fair maid.

To view other similar items in the archive click on the hyper-linked words below.